Suburbs

Suburbs


Beaverton is probably the city that started the urban sprawl. In the early 70’scompanies like Tektronix, Intel and Nike planted those trees that would become the ‘Silicon Forest’. Today the population is reaching 82,000 and has the traffic jams to prove it. Beaverton was the first real suburb where people could live and work in the same community. Shopping and errands could be handled during the lunch hour, and there was more time for the family. Much of this still exists in beautifully planned communities that invite neighbors to get out and talk to each other. Prices start at around $220,000 for starter homes in Aloha but you can find a very nice three bedroom two bath home for under $300,000. The average price is between $300,000 and $600,000 for a newer contemporary home in higher-end neighborhoods like Murrayhill. Light rail or ‘MAX’ connects Beaverton commuters into the city and offers a great way to go shopping in the City for an afternoon.

Aloha is a census-designated place and unincorporated community in Washington County, Oregon, United States. By road it is 10.9 miles west of downtown Portland. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 49,425. Fire protection and EMS services are provided through Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue.

As of the census of 2000, there were 41,741 people, 14,228 households, and 10,841 families residing in the community. The population density was 5,660.5 people per square mile. There were 14,851 housing units at an average density of 2,013.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the CDP was 79.40% White, 1.35% African American, 0.78% Native American, 7.69% Asian, 0.37% Pacific Islander, 6.70% from other races, and 3.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.93% of the population. There were 14,228 households out of which 42.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.4% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 16.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the community the population is spread out with 29.8% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 35.0% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 5.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 101.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.8 males.

The median income for a household in the community is $52,299, and the median income for a family was $56,566. Males had a median income of $40,369 versus $29,921 for females. The per capita income for the community is $19,685. About 5.6% of families and 7.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.4% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.

Hillsboro is the fifth-largest city in the State of Oregon and is the county seat of Washington County.[9] Lying in the Tualatin Valley on the west side of the Portland metropolitan area, the city hosts many high-technology companies, such as Intel, that comprise what has become known as the Silicon Forest.

Hillsboro has a council–manager government consisting of a city manager and a city council headed by a mayor. In addition to high-tech industry, sectors important to Hillsboro’s economy are health care, retail sales, and agriculture, including grapes and wineries. The city operates more than twenty parks and the mixed-use Hillsboro Stadium, and ten sites in the city are listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). Modes of transportation include private vehicles, public buses and light rail, and aircraft using the Hillsboro Airport. The city is home to Pacific University’s Health Professions Campus. Notable residents include two Oregon governors.

As of the census of 2010, there were 91,611 people, 33,289 households, and 22,440 families residing in the city. The population density was about 3,800 inhabitants per square mile. There were 35,487 housing units at an average density of about 1,500 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was approximately 73% White, 2% African American, 1% Native American, 9% Asian, less than 1% Pacific Islander, 10% from other races, and 5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were about 23% of the population.

There were 33,289 households of which about 38% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51% were married couples living together, 11% had a female householder with no husband present, 5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33% were non-families. About 24% of all households were made up of individuals and 6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.24.

The median age in the city was 32 years. About 27% of residents were under the age of 18; 9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 35% were from 25 to 44; 21% were from 45 to 64; and 8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.2% male and 49.8% female.

Lake Oswego, is primarily an affluent residential community (population 33,000), which began as the weekend retreat for Portland’s wealthy families. Over time it became one of the most sought after residential locations. Lake Oswego is located in the northwestern corner of Clackamas County, and is ideally situated close to Oregon’s major metropolitan areas–just 8 miles from downtown Portland and 45 minutes from the state capitol in Salem off Interstate 5.

There is a substantial business district along Kruse Way. This ½ mile long stretch is one of the largest collections of Class A office space outside of the downtown core. The only problem is the four story brick buildings all look the same. This area also has a few hotels and nice restaurants.

Surrounding the private lake are many impressive homes ranging from $800K to several million. This is a manmade Lake that was created in the early 1900’s. The Lake Oswego Lake Association does own three or four parks and boat docks that can be used by their members. Membership is determined by your home address and cannot be purchased. Many of the older homes in the more affordable neighborhoods have lake easements. The easements run with the property.

Lot sizes are fairly big with tree lined streets that are perfect for walking or biking. Lake Oswego has very little new construction. You may be able to find a new house here and there on an in-fill lot, but there are no new major developments with multiple homes.

Lake Oswego has the best schools in the State. This is one reason why so many families want to live here. In all fairness to the surrounding school districts (which are very good), Lake Oswego does not have a diverse population when you look at per household income. All of the other districts do. Check them out at: www.loswego.k12.or.us

Downtown Lake Oswego offers fine shops and boutiques, and many different kinds of restaurants. (See www.lofa.org) Outdoor art graces each downtown block, and is enhanced by beautiful hanging baskets, plaza plantings and green trees everywhere.

Spring brings the farmer’s market season. Lake Oswego Farmers Market is held every Saturday from mid-May to mid-October. The European style market includes a wide variety of regional produce, baked goods and nursery stock, as well as live entertainment and great food. It is located on the esplanade in downtown.

West Linn and Wilsonville are one School District and share many of the same attributes. West Linn is located just east of Lake Oswego and has a wonderful mountain offering homes with a view of Mt. Hood and the Willamette River that can not be matched anywhere. The housing ranges from small bungalows for around $240,000, large older homes in the $300,000. to $400,000. range and executive homes in the range of $450,000 to $900,000.  West Linn has a large concentration of upper-middle class families with small children. This area has a real sense of community.  Marylhurst College is also located in West Linn along the river.

Oregon City is the county seat of Clackamas County, Oregon, United States, located on the Willamette River near the southern limits of the Portland metropolitan area. Established in 1829 by the Hudson’s Bay Company, in 1844 it became the first U.S. city west of the Rocky Mountains to be incorporated. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 31,859.

Oregon City has several neighborhoods represented by official neighborhood associations

  • The Park Place neighborhood is in the northeastern corner of the city, located on a bluff overlooking Abernethy Green. The neighborhood includes a housing project, as well as numerous rural properties. Park Place, formerly an independent community, also includes unincorporated areas outside the city limits. First called Clackamas (a name that was later given to a community three miles north), then Paper Mill, the community was finally named Park Place for a park in a nearby oak grove. Park Place was platted in 1889, and a post office was established the following year. For a while the name was changed to “Parkplace.”
  • The McLoughlin neighborhood is bordered by Washington Street and Singer Hill on the Northwest, a bluff overlooking Abernethy Creek on the northeast and east, and Division Street on the south. It also includes extends to the west to border the Canemah district. The John McLoughlin House and the upper entrance to the Municipal Elevator are located in this neighborhood.
  • The Barclay Hills neighborhood lies between Rivercrest Park on the west, the city limits on the east, the McLoughlin Neighborhood on the north, and Warner-Milne Road on the south. This neighborhood is bisected by Molalla Avenue, the former route of Oregon Route 213 before it was moved to the Oregon City Bypass to the east.
  • The Canemah neighborhood lies along Oregon Route 99E, and is a narrow strip of land sandwiched between the Willamette River and a bluff. Canemah was once an independent city before being annexed into Oregon City. Canemah was founded in 1845 and was the portage site around Willamette Falls for many years. It was supposedly named after an Indian chief.
  • The Rivercrest neighborhood includes Rivercrest Park, and the residential communities overlooking the Willamette River to the west.
  • The South End neighborhood lies to the southwest of Rivercrest Park. It centers around the intersection of South End and Warner-Parrot roads, and was the location of Oregon City’s (now defunct) drive-in movie theater.
  • The Hazel Grove/Westling Farm neighborhood lies in the southwestern corner of the city, lying between the bluffs over the Willamette River and the unincorporated areas to the south.
  • The Tower Vista neighborhood lies southeast of South End, and east of Hazel Grove/Whistling Farm. It is bordered on the east and southeast by Leland Road.
  • The Hillendale neighborhood lies south of Warner-Milne Road, east of Leland Road, north of Clairmont Way and Beavercreek Road, and west of OR 213 and the city limits. The former site of City Hall is located here, as is the Clackamas County jail.
  • The Gaffney Lane neighborhood, centered around the elementary school of the same name, lies south of Hillendale, west of OR 213, and north/east of the city limits.
  • The Caufield neighborhood contains those parts of the city located south of Park Place, and east of OR 213. Clackamas Community College is located here, as is Oregon City High School.

Downtown Oregon City, along with Abernethy Green and those portions of the city north of I-205, are not represented by a neighborhood association.

As of the census of 2010, there were 31,859 people, 11,973 households, and 8,206 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,520.3 inhabitants per square mile. There were 12,900 housing units at an average density of 1,425.4 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 91.1% White, 0.6% African American, 0.9% Native American, 1.7% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 2.3% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.3% of the population.

There were 11,973 households of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 31.5% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.07.

The median age in the city was 36.3 years. 25.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.8% were from 25 to 44; 25.7% were from 45 to 64; and 11.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.3% male and 50.7% female.

Milwaukie is a city in Clackamas County, Oregon, United States. A very small portion of the city extends into Multnomah County. The population was 20,291 at the 2010 census. Founded in 1847 on the banks of the Willamette River, the city, known as the Dogwood City of the West, was incorporated in 1903 and is noted as the birthplace of the Bing cherry. The city is now a suburb of Portland and also adjoins the unincorporated areas of Clackamas and Oak Grove.

As of the census of 2010, there were 20,291 people, 8,667 households, and 5,075 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,209.8 inhabitants per square mile. There were 9,138 housing units at an average density of 1,895.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 88.5% White, 1.3% African American, 1.3% Native American, 2.5% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 2.5% from other races, and 3.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.0% of the population.[2]

There were 8,667 households of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.5% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.4% were non-families. 31.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.91.

The median age in the city was 39.9 years. 20.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.8% were from 25 to 44; 29.2% were from 45 to 64; and 13.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.6% male and 51.4% female.

Gladstone is a city located in Clackamas County, Oregon, United States. The population was 11,497 at the 2010 census. Gladstone is an approximately 4-square-mile suburban community, 12 miles south of Portland, the largest city in Oregon, and located at the confluence of the Clackamas and Willamette rivers.

Gladstone has held several important cultural and social events, hosting both the inaugural Clackamas County Fair and the Oregon State Fair, before both were moved to more spacious locations. Both Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan and presidential candidate Theodore Roosevelt have given public speeches in the city.

As of the census of 2010, there were 11,497 people, 4,540 households, and 3,009 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,790.4 inhabitants per square mile. There were 4,779 housing units at an average density of 1,991.3 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 89.2% White, 0.9% African American, 1.0% Native American, 1.6% Asian, 0.4% Pacific Islander, 3.4% from other races, and 3.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.7% of the population.

Gresham is a city located in Multnomah County, Oregon, United States, immediately east of Portland. Though it began as a settlement in the mid-1800s, it was not officially incorporated as a city until 1905, by which it was named after the American Civil War general, and Postmaster General, Walter Quinton Gresham.

The city’s early economy was sustained largely by farming, and by the mid-20th century, experienced a population boom, growing from four-thousand residents to over ten-thousand between 1960 and 1970. The population was 105,594 at the 2010 census, making Gresham the fourth largest city in Oregon.

As of the census of 2010, there were 105,594 people, 38,704 households, and 25,835 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,551.5 inhabitants per square mile. There were 41,015 housing units at an average density of 1,767.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 76.0% White, 3.5% African American, 1.3% Native American, 4.3% Asian, 0.7% Pacific Islander, 9.8% from other races, and 4.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.9% of the population.

There were 38,704 households of which 36.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.6% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.2% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.22.

The median age in the city was 33.6 years. 26.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.1% were from 25 to 44; 24.5% were from 45 to 64; and 10.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.0% male and 51.0% female.